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Wisconsin Car Insurance Requirements

Wisconsin Minimum Car Insurance Requirements

The state of Wisconsin requires drivers to carry two types of car insurance: liability coverage and uninsured motorist coverage. Along with these requirements, there are also state-mandated minimums for each insurance that every driver must meet. Those minimums, according to Wisconsin law, are as follows:

Liability Insurance

  • $25,000 for bodily injury per person
  • $50,000 for bodily injury per accident
  • $10,000 for property damage per accident

Uninsured Motorist Coverage

  • $25,000 for bodily injury per person
  • $50,000 for bodily injury per accident

Failure to carry such insurance in Wisconsin comes with some serious consequences. Also, keep in mind that if you have an auto loan or lease your vehicle, your lender or leasing company may require you to carry additional insurance.

Comparative Fault in Wisconsin

Comparative fault, commonly referred to as comparative negligence, means that each party in an accident is assigned a certain percentage of fault. If you have been found to be less at fault for the accident, you will receive compensation, but what you receive will be reduced based on how much of you have been found to be responsible for the accident. For example, if you are found to be 25% at fault for a collision, what you receive following making a claim will be discounted by 25%.

Wisconsin Liability Insurance

Like many other states, Wisconsin requires its drivers to carry liability insurance. Liability insurance covers bodily injuries and property damage you cause in an accident you have found to be at fault for. It is important to remember that your liability insurance will never pay for your injuries or damage to your property.

Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Wisconsin

On top of liability insurance, the state of Wisconsin requires drivers to carry a certain amount of uninsured motorist coverage. This type of insurance steps in to help you after an accident where the at-fault driver has no liability insurance. Wisconsin requires this type of insurance for bodily injuries.

Car Insurance Limits in Wisconsin

Nearly every state across the country sets some level of minimum insurance drivers must carry. This is referred to as a coverage limit. In the insurance world, it also is known as the maximum amount your insurer will payout following an accident. Coverage limits can be adjusted as you see fit, but they should never go below the mandated minimum.

In the state of Wisconsin, for example, liability insurance limits are expressed as 25/50/10. Each number refers to a different aspect of liability coverage: bodily injury per person, bodily injury per accident, and property damage, respectively. More on these categories can be found below:

  • Bodily injury per person is the maximum amount your insurer will pay for injuries to one person in an accident you caused.
  • Bodily injury per accident refers to the amount your insurance company will pay for all injuries in an accident you caused.
  • Property damage is how much your insurer will payout for the property you damage in an accident.

Uninsured motorist coverage limits operate in a similar fashion, with the key difference being they help pay for your medical expenses as opposed to the other driver. Uninsured motorist coverage limits in Wisconsin are expressed as 25/50.

Is Wisconsin’s Mandatory Insurance Minimums Enough Coverage?

In short, no. If you only carry the insurance that is required in the state of Wisconsin, you will be leasing your assets at risk. Suppose you end up causing an accident with multiple cars. You will be on the hook for all those repairs, and $10,000 in property damage coverage will only get you so far. It is recommended that you increase your coverage limits and look into any additional types of car insurance to include on your policy.

Driving Without Insurance in Wisconsin

In the state of Wisconsin, being caught driving without insurance can come with some serious penalties, but a lot depends on if you caused an accident or not. Anytime you are pulled over, you could be asked to provide proof of coverage. These penalties can vary but, typically, they will be worse if you end up causing an accident uninsured. Listed below is a general idea of the penalties you could be facing if caught driving without insurance.

  • A fine of up to $500
  • Licenses suspension
  • Reinstatement fees
  • SR22 certificate requirement

Additional Types of Car Insurance in Wisconsin

While Wisconsin requires drivers to carry liability insurance and uninsured motorist coverage, there are still other ways you can expand coverage. Listed below are some common types of car insurance you can add to your policy.

  • Collision: This covers damage to your vehicle after an accident with another car.
  • Comprehensive: This coverage pays for damage to your vehicle after a non-collision-related incident. Some perils covered under this policy include theft and extreme weather.
  • Medical Payments: This coverage will pay for medical expenses you and your passenger(s) accumulate following an accident.
  • Roadside Assistance: If your car experiences some technical issues when on the road, roadside assistance can be there to resolve mechanical problems.
  • Underinsured Motorist Coverage: This insurance can help cover expenses following an accident with someone who has some liability insurance but not enough to pay for the full extent of the damage.

Car Insurance is Important For Any Wisconsin Driver

Obtaining a car insurance policy is incredibly crucial in order to keep you and your assets protected. Accidents can get very costly, and anything not covered by your insurance may land back in your lap. You run the risk of putting your finances in a very unfortunate situation. It would be in your best interest to purchase a policy with enough coverage, both in terms of limits and policy add-ons.

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